Coronavirus vaccinations Schedule

Posted by: karenbarron2 - Posted on:

Information and advice

The Practice has now started the coronavirus vaccinations starting with our elderly and care home patients as per NHS England guidance

People who are most at risk from the complications of COVID-19 are being offered the vaccine first.

Patients will be contacted by text, telephone or letter in the following cohorts of patients.

The practice is currently vaccinating cohorts 1 – 9 shown below

Priority groups for coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination: advice from the JCVI, 2 December 2020 – GOV.UK

This priority list is as follows:

  1. residents in a care home for older adults and their carers
  2. all those 80 years of age and over and frontline health and social care workers
  3. all those 75 years of age and over
  4. all those 70 years of age and over and clinically extremely vulnerable individuals
  5. all those 65 years of age and over
  6. all individuals aged 16 years to 64 years with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality
  7. all those 60 years of age and over
  8. all those 55 years of age and over
  9. all those 50 years of age and over

COVID-19 vaccination: guide for healthcare workers – GOV.UK

If you’re a frontline worker in the NHS, you are more likely to be exposed to COVID-19 at work. Healthcare workers and those working in social care (particularly in care homes) are at much higher risk of repeated exposure to the infection.

Catching COVID-19 can be serious and may lead to long term complications. These are more common in older staff or those with underlying clinical risk factors.

You can have COVID-19 without any symptoms and pass it on to family, friends and patients, many of whom may be at increased risk from coronavirus. Being healthy doesn’t reduce your risk of catching COVID-19 or passing it on.

With high rates of COVID-19, it’s more important than ever to help stop the spread of coronavirus, to avoid pressure on the NHS and to keep the health and social care workforce healthy.

If you are an unpaid carer for a family member you will be contacted in Group 6

Side effects

Like all medicines, vaccines can cause side effects. Most of these are mild and short term, and not everyone gets them. Even if you do have symptoms after the first dose, you still need to have the second dose. Although you should get good protection from the first dose, having the second dose should give you longer lasting protection against the virus.

Very common side effects include:

  • having a painful, heavy feeling and tenderness in the arm where you had your injection. This tends to be worst around 1-2 days after the vaccine
  • feeling tired
  • headache
  • general aches, or mild flu like symptoms

Although feeling feverish is not uncommon for 2 to 3 days, a high temperature is unusual and may indicate you have COVID-19 or another infection. You can rest and take the normal dose of paracetamol (follow the advice in the packaging) to help you feel better.

Symptoms following vaccination normally last less than a week. If your symptoms seem to get worse or if you are concerned, call NHS 111.

If you do seek advice from a doctor or nurse, make sure you tell them about your vaccination (show them the vaccination card if possible) so that they can assess you properly.

COVID-19 vaccination: guide for older adults – GOV.UK

Can you catch COVID-19 from the vaccine?

You cannot catch COVID-19 from the vaccine but it is possible to have caught COVID-19 and not realise you have the symptoms until after your vaccination appointment.

The most important symptoms of COVID-19 are recent onset of any of the following:

  • a new continuous cough
  • a high temperature
  • a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell

If you have the symptoms above, stay at home and arrange to have a test. Further information on symptoms is available on NHS.UK.

COVID-19 vaccination: guide for older adults – GOV.UK

What to do next

After you have had the first dose you need to plan to attend your second appointment. You should have a record card and your next appointment should be between 3 and 12 weeks later.

Although the first dose will give you good protection, you need the second dose to get longer lasting protection.

Keep your record card safe and make sure you keep your next appointment to get your second dose.

COVID-19 vaccination: guide for older adults – GOV.UK

Further information is available on NHS.UK.